Camp Everytown nominations due today

Maya McNealis and Nika Woodfill

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Camp Everytown "hug necklaces" are given every year on the last day of camp and can be seen worn by alumni. Photo by Emma Chiu.

Camp Everytown “hug necklaces” are given every year on the last day of camp and can be seen worn by alumni. Photo by Emma Chiu.

Nominations to attend the annual Camp Everytown experience in January are due by email today.

The camp seeks to foster intense interactions between students and to find solutions to problems on the Palo Alto High School campus, according to Living Skills teacher and Camp Everytown Committee member Letitia Burton.

“Camp Everytown is a leadership training [opportunity],” Burton said. “It’s four days, we deal with issues of diversity and equity, we also deal with our own personal journey and how do we step into our own leadership. It’s not leadership like being in ASB or Congress, but just as a citizen of this country how can you step into your leadership.”

Students may email any one of the teachers on the Camp Everytown Committee to nominate themselves, or they may be nominated by one of their teachers. The camp is from Jan. 15 to Jan. 18.

This year, Burton anticipates the discussion on race will bring up the Ferguson ruling and police brutality linked to racism.

“I’m sure those issues will come up, as we deal with issues of race and ethnicity,” Burton said. “We deal with sexual orientation, we deal with gender issues and also family issues”.

This session, many students in the Associated Student Body and the Social Justice pathway are hoping to participate in the camp, but Burton hopes that any student, regardless of their interests and background, considers attending.

“Any student, any background, any socioeconomic status, any class, we want a full spectrum of kids from Paly,” Burton said.

Junior Dorothy Han, who attended the event last year, found it to be an eye-opening experience.

“It definitely shows you the privilege you have around you,” Han said. “It made me more compassionate toward others to know that we don’t always know what is happening in other peoples’ lives”.